Tag: travel

Photo Journey Indonesia, Part 1

Photo Journey Indonesia, Part 1

By Jackie Leavitt Indonesia epitomizes the word “diverse.” Its 17,500 islands spread 3,000 miles: further than the width of Europe. It encapsulates 255 million people with six recognized religions, although 90 percent are Muslim. It’s also home to many unique and endangered plants animals, including Sumatra’s orangutans and tigers and […]

Photo Journey Through NZ

Photo Journey Through NZ

By Jackie Leavitt After living in Gisborne for more than two months, Arthur and I decided to hit the winding New Zealand roads! Traveling and camping by car is very popular in New Zealand, and is inspiringly called “freedom camping.” Our goal: Freedom camp our way through […]

500 Miles at Sea

500 Miles at Sea

By Jackie Leavitt

Even 500 miles away from any sign of land, it’s difficult to shake the feeling that you’re not truly at sea. You look in front of you — at the bow of the sailboat cutting slowly through the blue, rippled salt water — and the slightly curved horizon remains unbroken in the distance. It’s a fluid line that stretches from left to right across your view, until it disappears, fuzzy at the edges. It gives the feeling that there’s something behind you, that if you turn around quickly enough, you’ll see rocks and trees and beaches and people flying kites in the ocean breeze. It’s like a game. You turn, but not fast enough, so you see only the stern of the boat, your white, foamy wake that fizzles into the distance, and another line of blue that stretches miles around you. You would also swear the depth of the water beneath you is only 40 or 50 feet – shallow enough for you to dive to the bottom, or at least see the bottom – rather than 400 or 500 or, really, thousands of feet. You sit on top of a giant chasm, and only physics keeps you from than sinking down, down… down into total darkness.

Blue is everywhere, in the ocean, in the sky. You are in a snow globe of blue, and instead of snow, there are puffy white and grey clouds that circle you. For the past few days, the scenery is unchanged except the storms in the skies. You could almost not be moving, like the boat is just spinning on wheels under the waves. The only way you know what direction you sail is that the white sun glimmers off the waves to one side of the boat. It’s late afternoon, and the sun will set in a couple of hours, slowly laying its shining gold cheek to rest in the clouds that linger on the line of your vision.

You face forward again, scanning the sea for ships, but there are none. There haven’t been for days. But then you do see something in the sky. Near the boat. It dips and curls in the invisible wind. Not a gull, but a tern. And turn it does, around and around you, questioning. What are you doing 500 miles from land? Do you ask this, or does the tern? It swings on its white wings behind your boat, checking out the colored, plastic squid that squirm on fishing lines behind your boat. Real? Fake? It asks, and circles around for a second look. It smells something fishy.

And then someone comes up on deck from inside the sailboat, and the tern catches a breeze toward the clouds and the endless blue horizon, and it disappears into the sparkling sun before you can say, Hey, there’s a tern, 500 miles at sea.

A California Sunday

A California Sunday

By Jackie Leavitt The train rocked gently, side to side, as it rolled north through the California suburbs. A gloom, a greyness, lingered over everything: the faded vinyl-covered houses, the hills parched from drought, the run-down corner stores yet to open, the flattened sky devoid […]

Building Meaningful Community with a Travel Lifestyle

Building Meaningful Community with a Travel Lifestyle

By Jackie Leavitt It can be difficult to build fresh communities and make friends in new locations. I found my new San Francisco friend group by meeting a man with a Scottish accent in an Irish bar. After being in the city for about a […]

Sunrise, Sunset

Sunrise, Sunset

By Jackie Leavitt

Sunsets have the power to stop you in your tracks. You could be in the middle of a run, breathing hard, sweat dripping down your back, when your feet stop on their own. You could be mid-conversation at a cafe enjoying an afternoon cappuccino, when your voice trails off as the beams of light illuminate your face. You could be an island in the stream of humanity, rooted to the sidewalk, while the rest of the 9-to-5-ers push past, oblivious, on their way home from their day in the office.

They demand silence and your full attention. Anything otherwise would be a shame to you and the sunset. Everything else stops mattering, except for you trying to comprehend how the sunlight can stream so sublimely over the clouds, highlighting the color spectrum that overwhelms your irises like multi-colored streamers above your head at a birthday party. The iridescence is a sacred fire in the heavens, and it feels holy as your face is bathed in the soft pink glow reflected in the sky. There’s a quality of awe, of inspiration, of peace, of magnificence.

And each sunset – and each moment within it – is unique because of the person viewing it, the scenery, the time of year, the weather. Do you have clouds to light the sky in pinks and purples, morphing into different shapes in the wind? Or do you have crystal clear vistas showing the chromatic order of indigo to gold? Did you get to see the mythical green flash as the sun set behind the skeptical ocean horizon?

And sunrises, the more subtle sister to the sunrise, can be even more stunning. Perhaps it’s because we see them less often – only if we wake up at a god-forsaken dark hour or if we stay up way past our usual REM patterns. They are a gift and a surprise, not to be taken for granted. Those few times you are actually up with a vista – it takes your breath away. Sometimes sunrises are soft, with a light blue sky painted with wispy, backlit clouds. Sometimes they are as vibrant and fiery as a sunset, with red streaking the sky like a premonition.

The strangest sunrise I’ve ever seen was an anchored-sailboat view of the ocean horizon, which seemed to be blanketed in the distance with a rust-brown haze. And yet, out emerged a perfect red orb from the waterline, creating the illusion that the fog was somehow behind the sun. It seemed as if the ball of fire climbed from the middle of a smoky sea like a phoenix rising from its ashes.

But there’s nothing like chasing a sunset with a window seat to the world. Sitting above the clouds in an airplane, you take over Zeus’ view, looking down on the snow-capped mountains or green-and-brown fields that stretch out as far as your airplane eye can see. Clouds checker-mark the landscape, or billow up like cotton candy, allowing only small peeks into the mysteries below. And the sunset stretches for miles and miles, and for minutes upon minutes, far longer than any human should have the honor to experience. It’s slow motion, where you have the luxury to gracefully move your glance around to soak in the deep blue, royal purple, rose pink, and orange-lemon colors that dominate the sky. It seems endless and still, although you and the sun and the earth are all moving at inconceivable speeds.

When the sun finally sinks behind your horizon, slowly the heat and the warm colors seep out of the sky, leaving behind a hazy, two-tone blue. It creates a strange feeling of an otherworldly view of a foreign planet. The curve of the ground matches the sweeping color of the heavens above, with only a light blue – almost white – cresting above the earth like a cold, desolate sphere’s last gasp of atmosphere. You are alien to it – alone.

Sunset from the sky
Sunset from the sky
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Sunset
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Sunset
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Light Oasis

Light Oasis

By Jackie Leavitt The blackness is complete. The sailboat rocks back and forth, the breeze pushing us along from behind, and the vessel feels like an island in outer space. We sail through a void. I can’t tell where the inky ocean meets the black […]

Ghost-Pepper Honey

Ghost-Pepper Honey

By Jackie Leavitt Seaward. I’ve begun to think of her as an evil four-year-old who will gleefully throw everything on the ground, when given the opportunity. I think everything should be in its special spot in the galley. She thinks everything belongs on the floor. […]

27

27

By Jackie Leavitt

I sit here, on Seaward off the coast of Southern California, taking in one of the most beautiful sunrises of my life. The sky turned from mysterious dark navy to indigo with cotton candy-colored wispy clouds to a gentle baby blue with golden clouds hinting of the sun about to crest over the horizon. It is not a bad way to start the 27th year of my life on this earth.

This past year has been the best of my life. I traveled all over the Caribbean on a sailboat for about five months, I backpacked through Colombia for two months, I started a new profession of cooking on boats, and I made a lot of new friends along the way. And one aspect of my travel that I treasure the most is my new connection with nature.

I’ve always loved going for hikes, camping and just generally appreciating the beauty that is this earth. But it wasn’t until this year that I started having up-close and personal interactions with crazy, wild life. The first magical moment was in Puerto Rico, snorkeling around the Vieques Island, and seeing my first stingray root around in the grassy bottoms, finding food for the day. The wings flew it through the water with an elegant ease.

After that, I saw my first little squids off the coast of the U.S. Virgin Islands – purple and brown, their side fins waved nonstop as they hovered in the water like tiny aliens. We swam together, with one squid being more cautious, but the other just as curious about me as I was of it, with us staring fascinated at one other.

Soon after that, while in the U.S. Virgin Islands, we swam with several sea turtles, which arched through the water in slow motion in their mellow, nonchalant attitude. How old those turtles were, I don’t know, but what they’ve gone through to be here today is beating the lottery of life, escaping the jaws of death each day, whether it’s from fellow sea creatures or humans.

Photo Credit: Lars Lindstrom

Life on the ocean is full of little moments that take your breath away. I had read about flying fish in The Long Way, and to see them for the first time left me confused as to if I were witnessing a bird or a sea creature – they literally fly above the water like fish-shaped hummingbirds, escaping the prey presumably hunting them below the water. You also see birds plummeting deep into and underneath the sea like flying cannon balls, dropping in on their unsuspecting prey.

I’ve seen oozing octopuses, fish the color of the rainbow, butterflies fluttering in a stronger breeze, dolphins jumping in the water off our bow as we cut along our path. In the turquoise waters of the Turks and Caicos, we snorkeled past a seven-foot black nurse shark, cozied into a coral reef with its tail swaying like a train behind it. In the Bahamas, we swam with a wild dolphin for an hour – it would catch our Frisbee in the water with its nose, then pass it to one of its fins, then try to transfer it to its other fin before dropping it, then try to catch it again before it slowly sank to the shallow sandy bottom. The next day, we pet a stingray that swam around our ankles like a sea dog, looking for attention.

We also caught our own fish, including Mahi Mahi, which created a strange combination of excitement and deep sadness as we reeled it in for our dinner that night, especially as the colors changed from vivid, electric green to a multi-colored blue as the life seeps away literally before our eyes.

Photo Credit: Preston Conroy
Photo Credit: Preston Conroy

As I start my new adventure on Seaward, heading to Mexico for the next few months, I begin to realize how easy it is for people to disconnect with the natural life of the earth. It is actually difficult to have a real connection – when you live in a town or city, buy your meats from the refrigerated grocery isle, and only get to breathe the clean fresh air when you go for your weekly hike or bike ride (if even that often).

I feel thankful that I am returning to nature – seeing it, touching it, smelling it, hearing it, tasting it, feeling it on my skin every day. It feels alive and good.

Friendsgiving

Friendsgiving

By Jackie Leavitt I am thankful for so many things. It’s true every year, but this one especially. A year ago, I would have never imagined what I would have done and what I’d currently be doing. It wasn’t even in the realm of possibility. Last […]